2018351_40-62

The competitive ability of maize (Zea mays L.)- common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) intercrops against weeds

Capacidad competitiva de los cultivos intercalados de maíz (Zea mays L.)-frijol (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) contra las malezas

Capacidade competitiva de milho intercalar (Zea mays L.)-feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) contra ervas daninhas

Elmira Charani1, Peyman Sharifi2* and Hashem Aminpanah2

Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, Iran. 1Ph.D. Student. Email: e.charani@yahoo.com. 2Associate Professor. Emails: peyman.sharifi@gmail.com, haminpanah@yahoo.com. Tel:+981333424080. Fax:+981333447060. Alternate E-mail: kadose@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Different combinations of maize (Zea mays L.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) intercropping ratios were compared with the sole cropping of each crop during 2011-2012 growing season in north of Iran. The experimental plots were laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Field experiment comprised five treatments including three intercropping combinations (3:1, 2:2 and 1:3) and sole culture of common bean and maize. Analysis of variance indicated that intercropping system significantly influenced bean and maize traits. The seed yields of common bean obtained from sole bean and maize: bean intercropping (1:3) was statistically similar and significantly higher than other intercropping treatments. The highest value of maize grain yield was obtained in sole cropping of maize. Total land equivalent ratio (LER) was grater to one (1.24) in two rows of common bean between two rows of maize (M50B50), indicating the increase of the yield in this intercropping treatment and advantage was equal to 24%. The highest competitive ratio (CR) for maize was obtained in M75B25. The maize sole crop and intercrops indicated a reduction in weeds, as compared with the bean sole crop. The intercrops of one row of common bean between three rows of maize (M75B25) seemed more suppressed weeds than both of maize and bean sole crops. This research indicates that maize-common bean intercropping was an appropriate method for utilizing the available resources and reducing weed infestations in organic farming systems. Bean had a proportionately low competitive effectiveness towards weeds and intercropping can be a way to produce successfully beans in organic farming.

Key words: Phaseolus vulgaris, Zea mays, sole cropping, yield advantage, weed.

Resumen

Diferentes combinaciones de maíz (Zea mays L.) y frijol (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) intercalados se compararon con el monocultivo de cada cultivo, durante 2011-2012 en el norte de Irán. Las parcelas experimentales se condujeron en un diseño de bloques completos al azar, con tres repeticiones. El experimento de campo estuvo compuesto por cinco tratamientos, incluyendo tres combinaciones de cultivos intercalados (3:1, 2:2 y 1:3) y los monocultivos de frijol y maíz. El análisis de varianza indicó que el sistema de cultivo intercalado influyó significativamente en los cultivos de frijol y maíz. El rendimiento de las semillas obtenidas de los cultivos de frijol y maíz y el frijol intercalado (1:3) fueron estadísticamente similares y significativamente mayores que los otros tratamientos intercalados. El valor más alto del rendimiento del maíz se obtuvo en el monocultivo. La relación del equivalente de tierra total (ETT) fue mayor a uno (1,24) en dos filas de frijol entre dos filas de maíz (M50B50), lo que indicó que el aumento del rendimiento fue igual a 24% en este tratamiento intercalado. La más alta relación competitiva (RC) para el maíz fue obtenida en M75B25. El monocultivo de maíz y cultivos asociados indicaron una reducción de las malezas, en comparación con el cultivo de frijol en mococultivo. En los cultivos asociados con una fila de frijol entre las tres filas de maíz (M75B25) hubo mayor supresión de las malezas que en los monocultivos de maíz y frijol. Los resultados indicaron que el cultivo intercalado de maíz-frijol fue un método apropiado para la utilización de los recursos disponibles y la reducción de las infestaciones de malezas en los sistemas agrícolas orgánicos. El frijol tuvo una eficacia competitiva proporcionalmente baja de las malezas y el cultivo intercalado podría ser una manera de producir con éxito frijoles en la agricultura orgánica.

Palabras clave: Phaseolus vulgaris, Zea mays, monocultivo, rendimiento, malezas.

Resumo

Diferentes combinações de milho (Zea mays L.) e feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) intercaladas foram comparadas com a monocultura de cada cultura durante a estação de crescimento 2011-2012 no norte do Irã. As parcelas experimentais foram conduzidas em um delineamento de blocos ao acaso, com três repetições. O experimento de campo consistiu em cinco tratamentos, incluindo três combinações de consórcio (3:1, 2:2 e 1:3) e as monoculturas de feijão e milho. A análise de variância indicou que o sistema intercalar teve uma influência significativa nas culturas de feijão e milho. O rendimento das sementes obtidas das culturas de feijão e milho e os grãos intercalados (1:3) foram estatisticamente similares e significativamente maiores do que os outros tratamentos intercalados. O maior valor de produção de milho foi obtido na monocultura. A proporção de equivalente terrestre total (ETT) foi superior a um (1,24) em duas filas de feijão entre duas fileiras de milho (M50B50), o que indicou que o aumento no rendimento foi igual a 24% neste tratamento intercalado. A maior razão competitiva (RC) para o milho foi obtida em M75B25. A monocultura de milho e culturas associadas indicou redução das ervas daninhas, em comparação com o cultivo de feijão em mococultivo. Nas culturas associadas a uma linha de feijões entre as três fileiras de milho (M75B25) houve maior supressão das ervas daninhas do que nas monoculturas de milho e feijão. Os resultados indicaram que o cultivo intercalado de milho foi um método apropriado para a utilização dos recursos disponíveis e a redução das infestações de ervas daninhas em sistemas agrícolas orgânicos. Os feijões tinham uma eficiência competitiva proporcionalmente baixa de ervas daninhas e o cultivo intercalado poderia ser uma forma de produzir com sucesso grãos na agricultura orgânica.

Palavras-chave: Phaseolus vulgaris, Zea mays, monocultura, rendimento, ervas daninhas.

Recibido el 07-12-2016 . Aceptado el 24-11-2017

*Corresponding author. Email: peyman.sharifi@gmail.com

Introduction

Grain legumes, such as common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) supply nitrogen (N) to the organic cropping system by their symbiosis with N2-fixing bacteria. Their grains are also rich in protein. However, most of these crops have a weak competitive ability regarding to weeds (Mcdonald, 2003), and weed harassment have been limited the N nutrition and grain yield of organically grown grain legumes (Corre-Hellou and Crozat, 2005). When suitable herbicides are not available, or there was a limitation in utility of herbicides in organic farming systems, intercropping of legumes with cereals may be an efficient management tool to control weeds (Szumigalski, 2005; Hauggaard-Nielsen et al., 2008). Tsubo et al. (2005) stated intercropping might provide a weed suppressive foundation by reducing of weed population. Beets (1990) declared the increase of leaf cover in intercropping systems helps to reduce weed populations once to crops establishment.

Liebman and Dyck (1993) indicated that weed density and biomass might be reduced by using intercropping and less weed growth might occur according to the more effective of intercrops than the sole crops in competing for resources with weeds or suppressing the weed growth through allelopathy. Several studies have displayed that a legume-cereal intercropping system is often significantly reduced weed biomass in compared to legume mono-cropping. However, cereal sole crops and intercrops have often exhibited similar competitive abilities against weeds (Hauggaard-Nielsen et al., 2001; Deveikyte et al., 2009). It is possible that intercrops increase the use of available resources, thus weeds have the less opportunity for establishment and growth. Some of crop mixtures, especially cereal-legume combinations, exhibit substantial yield advantages over sole crops; suggesting the completely and effectively use of the available resources by intercropping system (Hauggaard-Nielsen et al., 2009).

Intercropping also increase light interception by the weakly competitive component and can shorten the critical period for weed control and decrease growth and productiveness of late-emerging weeds (Baumann et al., 2000). Wilson (1988) indicated that the effect of belowground competition is often greater than that of aboveground competition. Nevertheless, competition between species for both light and soil resources is clearly interrelated. Corre-Hellou et al. (2011) examined the weed-suppression effect of pea-barley intercropping compared to the respective sole crops and indicated the weed biomass at maturity stage was three times higher under the pea sole crops than under intercrops and barley sole crops. The pea-barley intercrops exhibited high levels of weed suppression, even with a low percentage of barley in the total biomass.

Alford et al. (2003) planted eight legume species with maize (Zea mays L.) and compared yield of maize in monoculture and intercropping under weed-free and weedy conditions and indicated the legumes species were not able to adequately suppress weed growth. Odhiambo and Ariga (2001) studied the suppression of weeds like Striga hermonthica by maize-bean intercropping, indicated this system can be reduced weed incidence, and increased maize grain yield. Mongi et al. (1976) indicated the addition of cowpeas to the maize field suppresses weeds. Takim (2012) indicated that intercropping systems (50% maize:50% cowpea, planted on alternate rows) could be an eco-friendly approach for reducing weed infestations by non-chemical methods. Many researchers studied the intercropping of maize and bean crops and indicated mixtures of these two cereals and legumes produce higher grain yields than mono-cropping (Lima and Lopes, 1981; Rao and Morgado, 1984; Tsubo et al., 2005; Morgado and Willey, 2008; Yilmaz et al., 2008; Shahbazi and Sarajuoghi, 2012).

The aim of this study is to assess the productivity of maize-bean intercropping and to evaluate different maize-bean intercropping ratios to control of weeds infestation.

Materials and methods

Experimental trial

This study was conducted during 2011-2012 growing season at Rezvanshar (37o54’ N and 49o12’ E), Guilan, Iran, which lies at an altitude of 15 m above sea level. The experimental plots (12 m × 3 m) were laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Field experiments comprised five treatments including three different intercropping patterns and monocultures of common bean (P. vulgaris cv. a landrace from Guilan) and maize (Z. mays cv. 704 S.C.). The intercropping treatments included one row of maize between three rows of common bean (M25B75), two rows of common bean between two rows of maize (M50B50) and one row of common bean between three rows of maize (M75B25). The spaces for maize and common bean were 60 × 20 cm and 60 × 10 cm, respectively. A basal application of 100 kg·ha-1 di-ammonium phosphate, 100 kg·ha-1 potassium soleplate and 1/2 of the urea (50 kg·ha-1) was applied to plot in the furrow before planting. The remainder of the urea (50 kg·ha-1) was applied at 25 days after sowing.

The weeds were collected on three quadrates of 0.25 m2 per treatment and replication to consider the spatial distribution of the weeds as well. The sub-samples were dried at 70 °C in oven to a constant weight, and measured the weight of the dry biomass (DB). There were pooled the weight of three sub-samples for each treatment and replication. The most dominant and other weed species regarding to biomass were visually determined for each plot (table 1).

The insect pests were controlled by application of insecticides such as Ethion and Diazinon. Ten plants from each plot were sampled randomly for the determination of yield components. The whole plot was harvested for bean and maize seed yield. There were measured the traits containing number of rows per ear, number of grains per row, number of ears per plant, number of grains per ear, hundred grain weight, biomass yield and seed yield in maize. The measured traits in bean included number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, pod length, seed width and length, hundred seed weight and seed yield.

Competitions indices and monetary advantages

The benefit of intercropping and the effect of competition between the bean and maize were calculated using different competition indices. The land equivalent ratio (LER) calculated by dividing the amount of the intercropped yield by the amount of the mono-cropped yield for each crop in the field. Add the partial LERs together to find the total LER. LER is defined as the relative land area growing sole crops that are required to produce the yields achieved when growing intercrops. LER greater than one indicates that more sole cropped land than intercropped is required to produce a given amount of product. In contrast, when LER is lower than one, the intercropping negatively affects the growth and yield of plants grown in mixtures (Willey, 1979). The LERs calculated using this formula (Dhima et al., 2007):

LER = LERmaize + LERbean

Where, Ym and Yb are the yields of maize and bean as sole crops, respectively. Ymb and Ybm are the yields of maize and bean as intercrops, respectively.

The second coefficient index was the relative crowding coefficient (RCC) which calculated as: (Yilmaz et al., 2008).

RCC = (RCCmaize × RCCbean), where

RCCmaize = (Ymb × Zbm)/[(Ym - Ymb) × Zmb], and

RCCbean = (Ybm × Zmb)/[(Yb - Ybm) × Zbm].

Where, Zmb and Zbm were the proportions of maize and bean in the mixture, respectively. The value of RCC is greater than one, indicating there is a yield advantage; when RCC is equal to one, there is no yield advantage; and, when it is less than one, there is a disadvantage (Dhima et al., 2007).

The Competitive ratio (CR) represents the ratio of individual LERs of two crops and takes into account the proportion of the crops in which they are initially sown. Then, the CR index was calculated using the following formula (Dhima et al., 2007):

CRmaize = (LERmaize/LERbean)(Zbm/ Zmb), and

CRbean = (LERbean/LERmaize)(Zmb/Zbm)

Data analysis

All measured variables were assumed to be normally distributed and statistical analyses by ANOVA were performed using SAS software (SAS, 2002). The significance of difference between treatments were estimated using the least significance differences test (LSD) with α=0.05.

Results and discussion

Analysis of variance and mean comparison

Analysis of variance indicated that intercropping system significantly influenced some of bean traits such as number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, seed length, seed width and seed yield (table 2). Analysis of variance were also indicated intercropping treatments significantly influenced maize grain yield, hundred grain weight, number of grains per ear, number of grain per row and number of row per ear (table 3).

The seed yields of sole bean and one row of maize between three rows of common bean (M25B75) were statistically similar and significantly higher than other intercropping treatments. Seed width and length, number of pods per plant and number of seeds per pod were also similar in sole bean, M25B75 and two rows of common bean between two rows of maize (M50B50), whereas these traits were significantly lower in one row of common bean between three rows of maize (M75B25) (table 4).

The highest value of maize grain yield was obtained in sole maize intercropping (M100) (10320 kg·ha-1), followed by M75B25. The highest values of maize hundred-grain weight (40.08 g) were obtained from maize sole cropping. Two intercropping combinations (M25B75 and M50B50) produced the highest number of grains per ear. The highest numbers of grains per row and rows per ear were obtained in M100 and M25B75 intercropping ratios, respectively (table 5).

Competitive indices

Total LER for two intercropping ratios (M25B75 and M50B50) was greater than one, indicating an advantage for yield due to intercropping. On average, the intercropping had a 19 and 24% yield advantage over the sole cropping in the M25B75 and M50B50, respectively. In other words, the sole cropping needed 19 and 24% more land to produce the same yield as with these two intercropping systems. The LER of maize in M75B25 intercropping was near to one (0.9), while the LER of bean was around one-tenth. This means that the presence of beans in the intercropping reduced the maize yield only to 10%. However, the association of maize in the intercropping reduced the yield of beans by 90% in this intercropping ratio, although the expected reduction was 75%, because the plant density of intercropped beans was 25% of the population of sole beans. In M50B50 intercropping ratio, the LER of two species was greater than 0.5 and total LER were grater to one (1.24). Maize intercropped with bean indicated a positive relative crowding coefficient (RCC) value that was higher than one for all the intercropping patterns. The highest RCC was observed under M25B75 (3.01) followed by M50B50 (2.61) and M75B25 (1.05) (table 6).

An accurate estimation of the biological efficiency of the intercropping system was provided by land equivalent ratio (LER). In this context, estimating land productivity using the land equivalent ratio (LER) parameter in intercropping (cereal-legume) treatments indicated biomass and grain yield advantage over sole cropping most likely due to better use of growth resources (Banik, 1996). The greater value of LER than one has been associated with suppression of weeds, pests and pathogens and enhanced use of resources (Willey, 1979). According to this competitive index, there were three possible outcomes for intercropping systems, including yield advantage (LER>1), yield disadvantage (LER<1), and the intermediate result (LER= 1) (Vandermeer, 1989). The results of present study exhibited crop complementarities in maize-bean intercropping and yield advantage, as LER and RCC values were greater than unity for M25B75 and M50B50. The LER value for M75B25 was equal to one, indicating an intermediate result. Total LER were grater to one (1.24) in M50B50, indicating the increase of the yield advantage was equal to 24% (table 6). This finding was in agreement with Mukhala et al. (1999) that reported yield advantages in maize-bean intercropping over the sole cropping. These results are also similar to report of Mutungarimi et al. (2001), who indicated the intercropping of maize and beans in the same row resulted in highest LER value to other intercrops. This finding was also similar to results of other researchers, which indicated mixtures of bean and maize produce greater grain yields than sole culture (Lima and Lopes, 1981; Rao and Morgado, 1984; Tsubo et al., 2005; Morgado and Willey, 2008; Yilmaz et al., 2008; Shahbazi and Sarajuoghi, 2012). Latati et al. (2016) suggested that modification in the intercropped common bean rhizosphere-induced parameters facilitated P uptake, plant biomass and grain yield for intercropped maize under P-deficiency conditions. In terms of grain yield, intercropping had a positive and significant effect on total grain yield as attested by the higher LER (yield advantage) over that found in sole cropping. This observation indicates an increased crop performance and resource use efficiency of limiting resources.

Competitive ratio values for maize (CRmaize) were higher than CRbean in all of the intercropping ratios. The highest CR value for maize was obtained in M75B25. The CR values for bean were also increased with an increase in proportion of bean in the mixtures. The CR of maize for all of the intercropping ratios was higher than one, and the CR value of bean for most of cropping combinations was lower than one. CR gives a better measure of competitive ability of the crops and can be a better index compared to RCC (Willey and Rao, 1980). The higher values of CRmaize than one for all of the intercropping and lower values of it to unity in bean, indicates an advantage in yield compared with sole crops under these intercropping combinations. The highest CR value for maize was obtained in M75B25. This suggests that common bean in the intercropping system is less competitive than the associated maize. It was apparent that maize was the dominant component in the intercrop.

Weed suppression

The most dominant weed species in maize-bean fields (Silva et al., 2011; Esmaeilzadeh and Aminpanah, 2015; Nurk et al., 2017) were including C. album, A. retroflexus, A. blitoides, C. arvensis, S. xanthium, C. draba, S. viridis, S. nigrum, C. rotundus, and E. crusgalli (table 1). The weed dry biomass at maturity was significantly greater in bean sole crops than in maize sole crops or in the all of intercropping ratios (figure 1). Weed dry biomass was nearly two times higher for the bean sole crops than the bean-maize intercrops. The maize sole crops and intercrops reduced weeds infestation, as compared with the bean sole crop. There were not significant differences between weed dry biomass in maize sole crops and intercrops and between all of the three intercropping ratios. Weed dry biomass varied between 73 (M75B25) and 170 g·m-2 (bean sole crops). For all of the intercropping combinations, crop biomass tended to be lower when weed biomass in the crops was high (table 7). The lowest value of crop biomass (832 g·m-2) was obtained in bean sole crop, which the weed dry biomass was high (figure 1).

The maize and bean crops had a synergistic effect on the weed populations as indicated by the intercrops (M75B25 and M50B50) with a lower weed dry biomass in comparison to the average biomass of the two mono-crops. There was a difference between intercrops and sole crops, according to weed biomass. Compared to the bean mono-crops, the intercropping of two crops increased the crop biomass. Crop biomass was considered for determinations of differences between species in their competitive abilities against weeds (Poggio, 2005).

In present study, mono-cropping of bean had a lower weed suppression effect and tolerance to weed competition in comparison to the intercropping ratios and maize sole crops. A greater reduces of bean biomass in sole crops were caused by the high weed infestation (table 7). Moreover, maize mono-cropping and all intercropping ratios exhibited similar weed-suppression abilities; however, the reduction in weed diversity was more stable in intercrops than in bean sole crops. The results of other researches indicated that tolerance to weeds increase in intercropping compared to mono-cropping (Poggio, 2005; Gharineh and Moosavi, 2010; Corre-Hellou et al., 2011).

These studies have exhibited that the most dominant species were more suppressed than the other species as crop biomass increased. Liebman and Dyck (1993) said that differences in tolerance to weed expected between intercrops and mono crops and thus increased the advantages of the intercrops regarding extreme weed infestations. A reduction in weeds was indicated in intercropping than bean sole cropping. The general reduction in weed dry biomass in intercropping compared to the sole crop plots (also there were not statistically significant between maize sole crops and intercrops) reported by other researchers (Mongi et al., 1976; Odhiambo and Ariga, 2001; Shrestha et al., 2002; Takim et al., 2010; Corre-Hellou et al., 2011; Takim, 2012). The reason of this reduction may be due to the high plant population in the intercropping treatments and better ground cover that inhibited weed seed germination and subsequent growth (Takim, 2012).

The other reason for weed decreasing in intercropping plots is due to incensement of light interception by the weakly competitive component that lead to shorten the critical period for weed control and helps to improve weed suppression relative to sole culture, whose open canopy structure leads weeds (Baumann et al., 2000). Some of other researchers similarly concluded that annual intercrops could enhance both crop production and weed suppression in comparison to sole crops (Mongi et al., 1976; Odhiambo and Ariga, 2001; Szumigalski and Van Acker, 2005; Banik et al., 2006; Saucke and Ackermann, 2006; Corre-Hellou et al., 2011; Takim, 2012).

Conclusions

This study indicated that there was a significant variability in competitive index among the intercropping combinations. Therefore, common bean and maize could be intercropped and intercropping is much more efficient in utilizing the available resources than sole culture as indicated by the competitive indices. The other conclusions of this study are that intercropping system can be an eco-friendly practice for reducing weed problems through non-chemical methods. Intercropping maize and common bean in different combinations may influence yield caused by competition between two crops in comparison to sole cropping. The competition indices indicated that maize was the dominant component in all intercropping ratios. The mix-proportion of M50B50, gave high grain yield; while B25M75 lead to lower weed dry biomass compared to other intercropping combinations. This research displays that common bean-maize intercropping is a pertinent method for reducing weed infestations in organic farming systems. Common bean has a proportionately low competitive effectiveness towards weeds and intercropping can be a way to successfully produce common beans in organic farming.

Literature cited

Alford, C.M., J.M. Krall and S.D. Miller. 2003. Intercropping irrigated corn with annual legumes for fall forage in the high plains. Agron. J. 95:520-525.

Banik, P. 1996. Evaluation of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and legume intercroppingunder 1:1 and 2:1 row replacement series system. J. Agron. Crop Sci. 175:189-194.

Banik, P., A. Midya, B.K. Sarkar and S.S. Ghose. 2006. Wheat and chickpea intercropping systems in an additive series experiment: advantages and weed smothering. Eur. J. Agron. 24:325-332

Baumann, D.T., M.J. Kropf and L. Bastiaans. 2000. Intercropping leeks to suppress weeds. Weed Res. 40:361-376.

Beets, W.C. 1990. Raising and sustaining productivity of smallholder farming systems in the Tropics. Alkmaar, Holland: AgBé Publishing.

Corre-Hellou, G., A. Dibet, H. Hauggaard-Nielsen, Y. Crozat, M. Gooding, P. Ambus, C. Dahlmann, P. Fragstein, A. Pristeri, M. Monti and E.S. Jensen. 2011. The competitive ability of pea-barley intercrops against weeds and the interactions with crop productivity and soil N availability. Field Crops Res. 122:264-272.

Corre-Hellou, G. and Y. Crozat. 2005. N2 fixation and N supply in organic pea (Pisum sativum L.) cropping systems as affected by weeds and pea weevil (Sitona lineatus L.). Eur. J. Agron. 22:449-458.

Deveikyte, I., Z. Kadziuliene and L. Sarunaite. 2009. Weed suppression ability of spring cereal crops and peas in pure and mixed stands. Agron. Res. 7:239-244.

Dhima, K.V., A.S. Lithourgidis, I.B. Vasilakoglou and C.A. Dordas. 2007. Competition indices of common vetch and cereal intercrops in two seeding ratio. Field Crop. Res. 100:249-256.

Esmaeilzadeh, S. and H. Aminpanah. 2015. Effects of planting date and spatial arrangement on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) yield under weed-free and weedy conditions. Planta Daninha 33(3):425-432.

Gharineh, M.H. and S.A. Moosavi. 2010. Effects of intercropping (canola-faba bean) on density and diversity of weeds. Not. Sci. Biol. 2:109-112.

Hauggaard-Nielsen, H., P. Ambus and E.S. Jensen. 2001. Interspecific competition, nuse and interference with weeds in pea-barley intercropping. Field Crops Res. 70:101-109.

Hauggaard-Nielsen, H., B. Jrnsgaard, J. Kinane and E.S. Jensen. 2008. Grain legume-cereal intercropping: the practical application of diversity, competition and facilitation in arable and organic cropping systems. Ren. Agric. Food Syst. J. 23:3-12.

Hauggaard-Nielsen, H., M. Gooding, P. Ambus, G. Corre-Hellou, Y. Crozat, C. Dahlmann, A. Dibet, P. Fragstein, A. Pristeri, M. Monti and E.S. Jensen. 2009. Pea-barley intercropping for efficient symbiotic N2-fixation, soil N acquisition and use of other nutrients in European organic cropping systems. Field Crops Res. 113:64-71.

Latati, M., A. Bargaz, B. Belarbi, M. Lazali, S. Benlahrech, S. Tellah, G. Kaci, J.J. Drevon and S.M. Ounanea. 2016. The intercropping common bean with maize improves the rhizobial efficiency, resource use and grain yield under low phosphorus availability. Eur. J. Agron. 72:80-90.

Liebman, M. and E. Dyck. 1993. Crop rotation and intercropping strategies for weed management. Ecol. Appl. 3(1):92-122.

Lima, A.F. and L.H.O. Lopes. 1981. Plant population and spatial arrangement study on the intercropping of maize and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Northeast Brazil. p. 41-45. In: International Workshop On Intercropping, Patancheru, Proceedings. Patancheru: ICRISAT.

Mcdonald, G.K. 2003. Competitiveness against grass weeds in field pea genotypes. Weed Res. 43:48-58.

Mongi, H.O., A.P. Uriyo, Y.A. Sudi and B.R. Singh. 1976. An appraisal of some intercropping methods in terms of grain yield, response to applied phosphorus and monetary return from maize and cowpeas. East Afric. Agric. For. J. 42(1):66-70.

Morgado, L.B. and R.W. Willey. 2008. Optimum plant population for maize-bean intercropping system in the brazilian semi-arid region. Sci. Agric. 65:474-480.

Mukhala, E., J.M. Jager, L.D. Van Rensburg and S. Walker. 1999. Dietary nutrient deficiency in small-scale farming communities in South Africa: Benefits of intercropping maize (Zea mays) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Nutr. Res. 19:629-641.

Mutungarimi, A., I. Mariga and O. Chivinge. 2001. Effects of maize density, bean cultivar and bean spatial arrangement on intercrop performance. Afric. Crop Sci. J. 9(3):487-497.

Nurk, L., R. Graß, C. Pekrun and M. Wachendorf. 2017. Effect of sowing method and weed control on the performance of maize (Zea mays L.) intercropped with climbing beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Agriculture 7(51):1-12.

Odhiambo, G.D. and E.S. Ariga. 2001. Effect of intercropping maize and beans on Striga hermonthica incidence and grain yield. Seventh Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Maize conference. 11-15 February.

Poggio, S.L. 2005. Structure of weed communities occurring in monoculture and intercropping of field pea and barley. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 109:48-58.

Rao, M.R. and L.B. Morgado. 1984. A review of maize-beans and maiz e cowpea intercropping systems in the semi-arid Northeast Brazil. Pesqui. Agropecu. Bras. 19:179-192.

SAS. 2002. SAS User’s Guide: Statistics, Version 9.0. SAS Inst. Inc.; Cary, N.C., USA.

 

Saucke, H. and K. Ackermann. 2006. Weed suppression in mixed cropped grain peas and false flax (Camelina sativa). Weed Res. 46:453-461.

Shahbazi, M. and M. Sarajuoghi. 2012. Evaluating maize yield in intercropping with mungbean. Ann. Biol. Res. 3(3):1434-1436.

Shrestha, A., C. Kenzevic, S.Z. Roy, B.R. Ball-Coelho and C.J. Swanton. 2002. Effects of tillage, cover crop and crop rotation on the composition of weed flora in a sandy soil. Weed Res. 42:76-87.

Silva, P.S.L., P.I.B. Silva, K.M.B. Silva, V.R. Oliveira and F.S.T. Pontes Filho. 2011. Corn growth and yield in competition with weeds. Planta Daninha 29(4):793-802.

Szumigalski, A. and R. Van Acker. 2005. Weed suppression and crop production in annual intercrops. Weed Sci. 53:813-825.

Szumigalski, A. 2005. Studies of the functionality of annual crop and weed diversity in polyculture cropping systems. Ph.D. dissertation. The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. 218 p. 

Takim, F.O. 2012. Advantages of maize-cowpea intercropping over sole cropping through competition indices. J. Agric. Biodiver. Res. 1(4):53-59.

Takim, F.O. and O. Fadayomi. 2010. Influence of tillage and cropping systems on field emergence and growth of weeds and yield of maize (Zea mays L.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.). Aust. J. Agric. Engin. 1(4):141-148.

Tsubo, M., S. Walker and H.O. Ogindo. 2005. A simulation model of cereal-legume intercropping systems for semi-arid regions. II. Model application. Field Crops Res. 93:23-33.

Vandermeer, J. 1989. The ecology of intercropping. New York: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Willey, R.W. 1979. Intercropping-its importance and research needs. Part 1. Competition and yield advantages. Field Crop Abst. 32:1-10.

Willey, R.W. and M.R. Rao. 1980. A competitive ratio for quantifying competition between intercrops. Exp. Agric. 16:117-125.

Wilson, J.B. 1988. Shoot competition and root competition. J. Appl. Ecol. 25:279-296.

Yilmaz, F., M. Atak and N. Erayman. 2008. Identification of advantages of maize-legume intercropping over solitary cropping through competition indices in the East Mediterranean Region. Turk. J. Agric. For. 32:111-119.

Introducción

Las leguminosas, tales como el frijol (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) suministran nitrógeno (N) al sistema de cultivo orgánico por su simbiosis con bacterias fijadoras de N2. Sus granos también son ricos en proteínas. Sin embargo, la mayoría de estos cultivos tienen una capacidad competitiva débil con respecto a las malezas (Mcdonald, 2003), y este problema ha limitado la nutrición del N y el rendimiento del grano de las leguminosas cultivadas orgánicamente (Corre-Hellou y Crozat, 2005). Cuando no se dispone de pesticidas adecuados o cuando existe una limitación en la utilización de los pesticidas en los sistemas de cultivos orgánicos, el cultivo intercalado de leguminosas con cereales puede ser una herramienta de gestión eficaz para controlar las malezas (Szumigalski, 2005; Hauggaard-Nielsen et al., 2008). Tsubo et al. (2005) indicó que los cultivos intercalados pueden proporcionar una base supresora de las malezas mediante la reducción de la población de las mismas. Beets (1990) señaló que el aumento de la cubierta foliar en los sistemas de cultivos intercalados ayudó a reducir las poblaciones de malezas.

Liebman y Dyck (1993) indicaron que la densidad de las malezas y la biomasa podrían reducirse mediante el uso de cultivos intercalados en comparación con los monocultivos en la competencia con las malezas por recursos o la supresión del crecimiento de malezas a través de alelopatía. Diferentes estudios han demostrado que el sistema de cultivos intercalados de leguminosas-cereales redujo significativamente la biomasa de las malezas en comparación con el monocultivo de leguminosas. Sin embargo, el monocultivo de cereales y los cultivos intercalados a menudo presentan habilidades competitivas similares en la defensa de las malezas (Hauggaard-Nielsen et al., 2001; Deveikyte et al., 2009). Es posible que los cultivos intercalados aumenten el uso de los recursos disponibles, por lo que las malezas tienen menos oportunidades para establecerse y crecer. Algunas de las mezclas de cultivos, especialmente las combinaciones de leguminosas con cereales, presentan ventajas sustanciales de rendimiento sobre los monocultivos, sugiriendo el uso completo y eficaz de los recursos disponibles por el sistema del cultivo intercalado (Hauggaard-Nielsen et al., 2009).

El cultivo intercalado también aumenta la interceptación de la luz por el componente débilmente competitivo y puede acortar el período crítico para el control de malezas y disminuir el crecimiento y la productividad de las malezas emergentes tardías (Baumann et al., 2000). Wilson (1988) indicó que el efecto de la competencia en el sub-suelo fue a menudo mayor que el de la competencia en la superficie del suelo. Sin embargo, la competencia entre especies por recursos como la luz y el suelo están claramente interrelacionadas. Corre-Hellou et al. (2011) examinaron el efecto de la eliminación de malezas del cultivo intercalado de cebada-guisante en comparación con los monocultivos e indicaron que la biomasa de las malezas en la etapa de madurez fue tres veces más alta en los cultivos de guisante que en los cultivos intercalados y en el monocultivo de cebada. Los cultivos intercalados de cebada-guisante mostraron altos niveles de supresión de malezas, incluso con un bajo porcentaje de cebada en la biomasa total.

Alford et al. (2003) sembraron ocho especies de leguminosas con maíz (Zea mays L.) y compararon el rendimiento en el monocultivo de maíz y el cultivo intercalado con y sin malezas, e indicaron que las especies de leguminosas no fueron capaces de disminuir adecuadamente el crecimiento de las malezas. Odhiambo y Ariga (2001) estudiaron la supresión de malezas tales como Striga hermonthica en el cultivo intercalado de frijol-maíz, indicando que este sistema podría reducir la incidencia de malezas y aumentar el rendimiento del grano de maíz. Mongi et al. (1976) mencionaron que la adición de guisantes en el cultivo de maíz suprimió las malezas. Takim (2012) indicó que los sistemas de cultivo intercalado (50% de maíz:50% de frijol, plantados en hileras alternas) podría representar un enfoque ecológico para reducir las infestaciones de malezas por métodos no químicos. Muchos investigadores han estudiado el cultivo intercalado de maíz y frijol y las combinaciones de estos dos cereales y leguminosas, indicando que existen mayores rendimientos que en el monocultivo (Lima y Lopes, 1981; Rao y Morgado, 1984; Tsubo et al., 2005; Morgado y Willey, 2008; Yilmaz et al., 2008; Shahbazi y Sarajuoghi, 2012).

El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la productividad del cultivo intercalado de maíz-frijol y evaluar las diferentes proporciones de cultivos intercalados de frijol-maíz para el control de la infestación de malezas.

Materiales y métodos

Diseño experimental

Este estudio se llevó a cabo durante 2011-2012 en Rezvanshar ubicado a 37o54’ N y 49o12’ E, Guilan, Irán, a una altitud de 15 msnm. Las parcelas experimentales (12 m × 3 m) se establecieron en un diseño de bloques al azar con tres repeticiones. Los experimentos de campo abarcaron cinco tratamientos incluyendo tres patrones diferentes de cultivos intercalados y monocultivos de frijol (P. vulgaris cv. Guilan) y maíz (Z. mays cv. 704 S.C.). Los tratamientos de cultivo intercalado incluyeron una hilera de maíz entre tres hileras de frijol (M25B75), dos hileras de frijol entre dos hileras de maíz (M50B50) y una hilera de frijol entre tres hileras de maíz (M75B25). Las distancias de siembra para maíz y frijol fueron 60 x 20 cm y 60 x 10 cm, respectivamente. Se utilizó una aplicación basal de 100 kg·ha-1 fosfato de amonio, 100 kg·ha-1 de potasio y 50 kg·ha-1 de urea en el surco antes de la siembra. El resto de la urea (50 kg·ha-1) se aplicó 25 días después de la siembra.

Las malezas se recolectaron en tres recuadros de 0,25 m2 por tratamiento y por repetición para determinar su distribución espacial. Las sub-muestras se secaron a 70 °C en el horno a peso constante y se evaluó la biomasa seca (BS). El peso de las tres sub-muestras se agrupó para cada tratamiento y replica. Se determinaron visualmente las especies de malezas más dominantes y otras especies con respecto a la biomasa para cada parcela (cuadro 1).

Los insectos plagas se controlaron con el uso de pesticidas tales como Etión y Diazinón. Se seleccioaron aleatoriamente 10 plantas de cada parcela para determinar los componentes del rendimiento. Se recolectó la parcela completa para medir el rendimiento de las semillas de frijol y maíz. Se midieron variables como el número de hileras por mazorca, el número de granos por hilera, el número de mazorcas por planta, el número de granos por mazorca, el peso de 100 semillas, el rendimiento de la cosecha y el rendimiento de la semilla en el maíz. Las variables evaluadas en el frijol incluyeron el número de vainas por planta, el número de semillas por vaina, la longitud de la vaina, la anchura y la longitud de las semillas, el peso de 100 semillas y el rendimiento de las semillas.

Índices de competencias y ventajas económicas

Se calcularon el beneficio del cultivo intercalado y el efecto de la competencia entre el frijol y el maíz utilizando diferentes índices de competencia. La relación del equivalente de tierra total (ETT) se calculó dividiendo el rendimiento del cultivo intercalado entre el rendimiento del monocultivo para cada cosecha. Se agregó el ETT parcial para determinar el ETT total. Se define ETT como el área de la tierra en donde se cosechan monocultivos requeridos para producir los rendimientos alcanzados al momento de realizar cultivos intercalados.  ETT mayor a uno indica que se requiere mayor producción del monocultivo que del cultivo intercalado para producir una determinada cantidad de producto. Por otra parte, cuando ETT es inferior a uno, el cultivo intercalado afecta negativamente el crecimiento y el rendimiento del monocultivo (Willey, 1979). ETT se calculó usando la siguiente fórmula (Dhima et al., 2007):

ETT= ETTmaíz + ETTfrijol

Donde, RM y Rf son los rendimientos de maíz y frijol como monocultivos, respectivamente. RMf y RBfm son los rendimientos de maíz y frijol como cultivos intercalados, respectivamente. 
El segundo índice de coeficiente fue el coeficiente de aglomeración relativo (CAR) que se calculó según Yilmaz et al. (2008).

CAR = (CARmaíz × CARfrijol), donde

CARmaíz= Rmf × Zfm)/[(Rm - Rmb) × Zmf], y

CARfrijol= (Rfm × Zmf)/[(Rf – Rfm) × Zbm].

Donde, Zmf y Zfm fueron las proporciones de maíz y frijol en la mezcla, respectivamente. Cuando el valor de CAR es mayor a uno, indica que hay una ventaja en el rendimiento; cuando el CAR es igual a uno, no hay ventaja en el rendimiento y cuando es menor a uno, hay desventaja (Dhima et al., 2007).

La relación competitiva (RC) representa la proporción de ETT individual de dos cultivos, considerando la proporción de los cultivos que se sembraron inicialmente. Para calcular el índice de RC se utilizó la siguiente fórmula (Dhima et al., 2007):

RCmaíz = (ETTmaíz /ETTfrijol)(Zfm/Zmj), y

RCfrijol = (ETTfrijol/TTmaíz)(Zmf/Zfm)

Análisis de la información

Todas las variables evaluadas se asumió que tuvieron distribución normal y los análisis estadísticos por ANOVA se realizaron utilizando el software SAS (SAS, 2002). Se estimó la importancia de la diferencia entre tratamientos usando la prueba de diferencias de menor significancia (LSD) con α=0,05.

Resultados y discusión

Análisis de varianza y comparación de medias

El análisis de varianza indicó que el sistema de cultivo intercalado influyó significativamente en algunas de las características del frijol, tales como el número de vainas por planta, el número de semillas por vaina, la longitud de la semilla, el ancho de la semilla y el rendimiento de la semilla (cuadro 2). El análisis de varianza también indicó que los cultivos intercalados influyeron significativamente sobre el rendimiento del grano de maíz, el peso de 100 semillas, el número de granos por mazorca, el número de granos por hilera y el número de hilera por mazorca (cuadro 3).

El rendimiento de las semillas de frijol y una hilera de maíz entre tres hileras de frijol (M25B75) fueron estadísticamente similares y significativamente más altos que otros tratamientos de cultivos intercalados. La anchura y la longitud de las semillas, el número de vainas por planta y el número de semillas por vaina, también fueron similares en el frijol, M25B75 y dos hileras de frijol entre dos hileras de maíz (M50B50); por otra parte, estas variables fueron significativamente más bajas en una hilera de frijol entre tres hileras de maíz (M75B25) (cuadro 4).

El valor más alto del rendimiento de los granos de maíz se obtuvo en el monocultivo de maíz (M100) (10320 kg·ha-1), seguido de M75B25. Los valores más altos del peso de l00 semillas de maíz (40,08 g) se obtuvieron en el monocultivo de maíz. Dos combinaciones de cultivos intercalados (M25B75 y M50B50) produjeron el mayor número de granos por mazorca. El mayor número de granos por hilera e hileras por mazorca se obtuvieron en los cultivos intercalados M100 y M25B75, respectivamente (cuadro 5).

Índices competitivos 

El ETT total para dos coeficientes de cultivo intercalado (M25B75 y M50B50) fue mayor a uno, lo que indicó una ventaja para el rendimiento debido al cultivo intercalado. En promedio, el cultivo intercalado tuvo una ventaja de rendimiento de 19 y 24% sobre el monocultivo en M25B75 y M50B50, respectivamente. En otras palabras, el monocultivo necesitó 19 y 24% más superficie de siembra para producir el mismo rendimiento que estos dos sistemas de cultivo intercalado. El ETT del maíz en el cultivo intercalado de M75B25 estuvo cercano a uno (0,9), mientras que el ETT del frijol estuvo alrededor de una décima parte. Esto significa que la presencia de frijoles en el cultivo intercalado redujo el rendimiento del monocultivo de maiz en 10%. Sin embargo, el uso de maíz en el cultivo intercalado redujo el rendimiento de frijoles en un 90% en esta proporción de cultivo intercalado, aunque la reducción prevista fue del 75%, debido a que la densidad de plantas de frijoles intercaladas fue del 25% de la población de monocultivo de frijol. En la relación del cultivo intercalado de M50B50, el ETT de dos especies fue mayor a 0,5 y el ETT total fue mayor a uno (1,24). El cultivo intercalado de maíz con frijol indicó un valor positivo del coeficiente de aglomeración relativo (CAR) el cual fue mayor a uno para todas las combinaciones de cultivos intercalados. El CAR más alto se observó en M25B75 (3,01) seguido por M50B50 (2,61) y M75B25 (1,05) (cuadro 6).

La relación del ETT proporcionó una estimación precisa de la eficacia biológica del sistema de cultivo intercalado. En este contexto, la estimación de la productividad de la tierra utilizando el parámetro de la relación del equivalente de tierra total (ETT) en los tratamientos de cultivos intercalados (leguminosas-cereales) indicó mayor biomasa y la ventaja del rendimiento del grano sobre el monocultivo, tal vez debido a un mejor uso de los recursos de crecimiento (Banik, 1996). El mayor valor de ETT estuvo asociado con la disminución de malezas, plagas y patógenos y un mejor uso de los recursos (Willey, 1979). De acuerdo con este índice competitivo, hubo tres resultados posibles para los sistemas de cultivos intercalados, incluyendo la ventaja de rendimiento (ETT>1), la desventaja de rendimiento (ETT<1), y el resultado intermedio (ETT= 1) (Vandermeer, 1989). Los resultados del presente estudio mostraron ventajas en los cultivos intercalados de maíz-frijol al igual que ventajas en el rendimiento, ya que los valores de ETT y CAR fueron mayores que los monocultivos M25B75 y M50B50. El valor ETT para M75B25 fue igual a uno, indicando un resultado intermedio. El ETT total fue mayor a uno (1,24) en M50B50, indicando que el aumento de la ventaja del rendimiento fue igual a 24% (cuadro 6). Este hallazgo estuvo en concordancia con Mukhala et al. (1999) quienes reportaron ventajas en el rendimiento del cultivo intercalado de maíz-frijol en comparación con el monocultivo. Estos resultados también fueron similares a los reportados por Mutungarimi et al. (2001), quienes indicaron que el cultivo intercalado de maíz y frijol en la misma hilera condujo a un mayor valor de ETT en comparación con otros cultivos intercalados. Este hallazgo también fue similar a los resultados de otros investigadores, quienes indicaron que las combinaciones de frijol y maíz produjeron mayores rendimientos del grano en comparación con el monocultivo (Lima y Lopes, 1981; Rao y Morgado, 1984; Tsubo et al., 2005; Morgado y Willey, 2008; Yilmaz et al., 2008; Shahbazi y Sarajuoghi, 2012). Latati et al. (2016) sugirieron que la modificación en los cultivos intercalados de frijoles facilitó la ingesta de P en la rizosfera, la biomasa de las plantas y el rendimiento del grano en el cultivo intercalado de maíz en condiciones de deficiencia de P. En términos de rendimiento del grano, el cultivo intercalado tuvo un efecto positivo y significativo sobre el rendimiento total del grano, hecho observable debido al mayor ETT (ventaja de rendimiento) en comparación con el monocultivo. Lo anterior indicó un aumento en el rendimiento de los cultivos y la eficiencia del uso de los recursos.

Los valores de la relación competitiva para el maíz (RCmaíz) fueron más altos que RCfrijol en la relación de los cultivos intercalados. El valor más alto de RC para el maíz se obtuvo en M75B25. Los valores de RC en el frijol también aumentaron debido al incremento de la proporción de frijol en las mezclas. El RC de maíz para la relación de cultivos intercalados fue superior a uno, y el valor de RC de frijol para la mayoría de las combinaciones de cultivo fue inferior a uno. RC ofreció una mayor capacidad competitiva de los cultivos y podría ser un mejor índice en comparación con CAR (Willey y Rao, 1980). Los valores más altos a uno de RCmaíz para todos los cultivos intercalados y valores más bajos en el frijol indicaron una ventaja en el rendimiento en comparación con los monocultivos bajo estas combinaciones de cultivos intercalados. El valor más alto de RC para el maíz se obtuvo en M75B25. Esto sugiere que el frijol en el sistema de cultivos intercalados fue menos competitivo que el maíz. El maíz fue el componente dominante en el cultivo intercalado.

Control de las malezas

Se incluyeron las especies más dominantes de malezas en los campos de maíz-frijol, C. album, A. retroflexus, A. blitoides, C. crusgalli (cuadro 1) (Silva et al., 2011; Esmaeilzadeh y Aminpanah, 2015; Nurk et al., 2017). La biomasa seca de Xanthium, C. draba, S. viridis, S. nigrum, C. rotundus y E. arvensis durante la madurez fue significativamente mayor en el monocultivo de frijol que en el de maíz o en la totalidad de los cultivos intercalados (figura 1). La biomasa seca de las malezas fue casi dos veces más alta en el monocultivo de frijol que en los cultivos intercalados de maíz y frijol. El monocultivo de maíz y los cultivos intercalados redujeron la infestación de malezas en comparación con el monocultivo de frijol. No hubo diferencias significativas entre la biomasa seca de las malezas en el monocultivo de maíz y los cultivos intercalados y entre la relación de los tres cultivos intercalados. La biomasa seca de las malezas varió entre 73 (M75B25) y 170 g·m-2 (monocultivo de frijol). En todas las combinaciones de cultivos intercalados, la biomasa de los cultivos tendió a ser menor cuando la biomasa de las malezas en los cultivos fue alta (cuadro 7). El valor más bajo de la biomasa del cultivo (832 g·m-2) se obtuvo en el monocultivo de frijol y la biomasa seca de malezas fue alta (figura 1).

Los cultivos de maíz y frijol tuvieron un efecto sinérgico en las poblaciones de malezas según lo indicado en los cultivos intercalados (M75B25 y M50B50) con una biomasa seca de las malezas inferior en comparación con la biomasa media de los dos monocultivos. Según la biomasa de las malezas, hubo una diferencia entre los cultivos intercalados y los monocultivos. El cultivo intercalado de dos cultivos, en comparación con los monocultivos de frijol, aumentó la biomasa de los cultivos. Se consideró la biomasa de los cultivos para determinar las diferencias entre las especies en sus habilidades competitivas contra las malezas (Poggio, 2005)

En el presente estudio, el monocultivo de frijol tuvo un menor efecto de control de las malezas y tolerancia en la competencia de malezas en comparación con las proporciones de los cultivos intercalados y el monocultivo de maíz. Hubo una mayor reducción de la biomasa de frijol en los monocultivos causada por una alta infestación de malezas (cuadro 7). Además, el monocultivo de maíz y todos las relaciones de los cultivos intercalados mostraron capacidades similares de supresión de malezas; sin embargo, la reducción de la diversidad de las malezas fue más estable en los cultivos intercalados que en los monocultivos de frijol. Los resultados de otras investigaciones indicaron que la tolerancia a las malezas aumentó en el cultivo intercalado en comparación con el monocultivo (Poggio, 2005; Gharineh y Moosavi, 2010; Corre-Hellou et al., 2011).

Estos estudios han demostrado que las especies más dominantes estuvieron más reprimidas en comparación a las otras especies a medida que aumentó la biomasa de los cultivos. Liebman y Dyck (1993) indicaron que las diferencias en la tolerancia a la maleza eran de esperarse entre los cultivos intercalados y los monocultivos, aumentando asi las ventajas de los cultivos intercalados con respecto a las grandes infestaciones de malezas. Se observó una reducción de las malezas en el cultivo intercalado. La reducción general de la biomasa seca de las malezas en el cultivo 11.5

Otra razón para la disminución de malezas en los cultivos intercalados podría atribuirse a la interceptación de la luz por el componente débilmente competitivo que condujo a acortar el período crítico para el control de malezas y ayudó a mejorar la supresión de malezas con relación al monocultivo, cuya estructura de dosel abierto condujo al crecimiento de malezas (Baumann et al., 2000). Algunos investigadores también concluyeron que los cultivos intercalados anuales podrían mejorar tanto la producción de cultivos como la disminución de las malezas en comparación con los monocultivos (Mongi et al., 1976; Odhiambo y Ariga, 2001; Szumigalski y Van Acker, 2005; Banik et al., 2006; Saucke y Ackermann, 2006; Corre-Hellou et al., 2011; Takim, 2012).

Conclusiones

Este estudio indicó que existe una diferencia significativa entre el índice competitivo y las combinaciones de cultivo intercalado. Por lo tanto, el frijol y el maíz podrían intercalarse y el cultivo intercalado es mucho más eficiente en la utilización de los recursos disponibles que el monocultivo, como lo indican los índices competitivos. Adicionalmente, el sistema de cultivo intercalado puede ser una práctica respetuosa con el ambiente para reducir los problemas de malezas a través de métodos no químicos. El cultivo intercalado de maíz y frijol en diferentes combinaciones puede influir en el rendimiento debido a la competencia entre dos cultivos en comparación con el monocultivo. Los índices de competencia indicaron que el maíz fue el componente dominante en todos los coeficientes de los cultivos intercalados.

La proporción de M50B50 produjo un alto rendimiento del grano; mientras que B25M75 condujo a disminuir la biomasa seca de la maleza en comparación a otras combinaciones de cultivos intercalados. Esta investigación muestra que el cultivo intercalado de frijol-maíz es un método adecuado para reducir las infestaciones de malezas en los sistemas de cultivo orgánico. El frijol posee una eficacia competitiva proporcionalmente baja hacia las malezas y el cultivo intercalado puede ser una manera de producir frijoles en la agricultura ecológica.

Fin de la versión Español

Table 1. The dominant weed species (recurrent species) and the other species.

Cuadro 1. Especies de malezas dominantes (especies recurrentes) y otras especies.

Recurrent species

Other species

Chenopodium album

Amaranthus blitoides, A. retroflexus, Convolvulus arvensis, Xanthium strumarium, Setaria viridis, Cardaria draba, Cyperus rotundus, Solanum nigrum, Echinochloa crusgalli.

Table 2. Analysis of variance for yield and yield components of bean in intercropping ratios.

Cuadro 2. Análisis de varianza para el rendimiento y los componentes del rendimiento de frijol en relación a los cultivos intercalados.

MS

Df

SOV

NPP

NSP

SL

SW

HSW

PL

SY

0.49ns

0.035ns

0.015ns

0.047ns

6.25ns

0.01ns

3460.33ns

2

Block

36.91**

0.36**

0.89**

0.39**

7.63ns

0.20ns

395846.22**

3

Intercropping system

2.33

0.074

0.11

0.027

3.47

0.32

1385.88

6

Error

16.74

6.86

2.99

2.30

4.80

497

6.63

C.V. (%)

ns: not significant; * and**: significant at 5% and 1% probability levels, respectively.

NPP: number of pods per plant; NSP: number of seeds per pod; PL: pod length: SL: seed length; SW: seed width; HSW: hundred seed weight; SY: seed yield.

Table 3. Analysis of variance for yield and yield components of maize in intercropping ratios.

Cuadro 3. Análisis de varianza para el rendimiento y los componentes del rendimiento de maíz en relación a los cultivos intercalados.

MS

df

SOV

NRE

NGR

NEP

NGE

HSW

GY

0.201ns

1.30ns

0.011ns

55.04ns

2.08ns

17318.88ns

2

Block

1.61**

23.49**

0.016ns

3000.87**

141.66**

30471085.2**

3

Intercropping system

0.23

0.92

0.019

76.27

2.08

14595.68

6

Error

3.48

2.15

8.55

1.43

4.22

1.58

C.V. (%)

ns: not significant; * and**: significant at 5% and 1% probability levels, respectively.

NRE: number of rows per ear: NGR: number of grains per row; NEP: number of ears per plant; NGE: number of grains per ear: HSW: hundred grain weight; GY: grain yield.

Table 4. Mean comparison of yield and yield components of bean in intercropping ratios.

Cuadro 4. Comparación del rendimiento y los componentes del rendimiento de frijol en relación a los cultivos intercalados.

NPP

NSP

SL (mm)

SW (mm)

HSW (g)

PL (cm)

SY

(kg·ha-1)

Planting ratio

(B:bean-M:maize)

11.30a

3.87b

11.43a

7.60a

40.00a

11.33a

843.333a

B100

9.47a

3.83b

11.03a

7.45a

39.33a

11.66a

848.00a

M25B75

11.53a

3.73b

11.26a

7.36a

38.33a

11.06a

467.33b

M50B50

4.00b

4.50a

10.20b

6.76b

36.66a

11.53a

174.37c

M75B25

NPP: number of pods per plant; NSP: number of seeds per pod: PL: pod length: SL: seed length; SW: seed width; HSW: hundred seed weight; SY: seed yield.

B100: sole bean; M25B75: one row of maize between three rows of common bean; M50B50: two rows of common bean between two rows of maize; M75B25: one row of common bean between three rows of maize.

Table 5. Mean comparison of yield and yield components of maize in intercropping ratios.

Cuadro 5. Comparación del rendimiento y los componentes del rendimiento de maíz en relación a los cultivos intercalados.

NRE

NGR

NEP

NGE

HSW (g)

GY

(kg·ha-1)

Planting ratio

(B:bean-M:maize)

14.97a

45.83ab

1.73a

643.46a

30.41b

3323d

M25B75

13.60b

45.00b

1.60a

626.30a

39.88a

7112c

M50B50

13.47b

40.63c

1.66a

573.76c

26.66c

9732b

M75B25

13.47b

47.06a

1.56a

592.50b

40.08a

10320a

M100

NRE: number of rows per ear: NGR: number of grains per row; NEP: number of ears per plant; NGE: number of grains per ear: HSW: hundred grain weight; GY: grain yield.

M100: sole maize; M25B75: one row of maize between three rows of common bean; M50B50: two rows of common bean between two rows of maize; M75B25: one row of common bean between three rows of maize.

Table 6. Effect of planting ratios on intercropping efficiency of bean-maize.

Cuadro 6. Efecto de las proporciones de siembra en la eficiencia del cultivo intercalado frijol-maíz.

CRbean

CRmaize

Total RCC

RCC maize

RCC bean

LER

LERmaize

LERbean

Planting ratio

(B:bean-M:maize)

0.89

1.12

3.01

1.42

2.17

1.19

0.32

0.86

M25B75

0.79

1.25

2.61

2.22

1.18

1.24

0.69

0.55

M50B50

0.33

3.00

1.05

3.15

0.33

1.00

0.90

0.10

M75B25

LER: land equivalent ratios; RCC: relative crowding coefficient; CR: competitive ratio.

M25B75: one row of maize between three rows of common bean; M50B50: two rows of common bean between two rows of maize; M75B25: one row of common bean between three rows of maize.

Table 7. Crop biomass (dry biomass, g·m−2) at maturity under intercropping ratios. The means per class and standard errors (se) are given.

Intercroping ratio

Mean

SE

B100

832

120.08

M25B75

2200.69

39.64

M50B50

2957.57

34.29

M75B25

3800.09

134.34

M100

5600.00

346.82

B100: sole bean; M25B75: one row of maize between three rows of common bean; M50B50: two rows of common bean between two rows of maize; M75B25: one row of common bean between three rows of maize; M100: sole maize.

Figure 1. Weed dry biomass (g·m−2) in the bean sole crops (B100), maize sole crops (M100) and bean-maize intercrops. The columns with the same letter within each individual diagram were not significantly different using least significant differences (LSD). B100: sole bean; M25B75: one row of maize between three rows of common bean; M50B50: two rows of common bean between two rows of maize; M75B25: one row of common bean between three rows of maize; M100: sole maize.

Figure 1. Weed dry biomass (g·m-2) in the bean sole crops (B100), maize sole crops (M100) and bean-maize intercrops. The columns with the same letter within each individual diagram were not significantly different using least significant differences (LSD). B100: sole bean; M25B75: one row of maize between three rows of common bean; M50B50: two rows of common bean between two rows of maize; M75B25: one row of common bean between three rows of maize; M100: sole maize.

Figura 1. Biomasa seca de las malezas (g·m-2) en los monocultivos de frijol (B100) y maíz (M100) y cultivos intercalados frijol-maíz. Las columnas con la misma letra no presentaron diferencias significativas (LSD). B100: monocultivo de frijol; M25B75: una hilera de maíz entre tres hileras de frijol; M50B50: dos hileras de frijol entre dos hileras de maíz; M75B25: una hilera de frijol entre tres hileras de maíz; M100: solo maíz.

Weed dry biomass (g·m−2)

Bean-Maize intercrops

Table 7. Crop biomass (dry biomass, g·m-2) at maturity under intercropping ratios. The means per class and standard errors (SE) are given.

Cuadro 7. Biomasa de los cultivos (biomasa seca, g·m-2) en etapa de madurez en relación a los cultivos intercalados. Se incluyen las medias y los errores estándares (EE).

Intercroping ratio

Mean

SE

B100

832

120.08

M25B75

2200.69

39.64

M50B50

2957.57

34.29

M75B25

3800.09

134.34

M100

5600.00

346.82

B100: sole bean; M25B75: one row of maize between three rows of common bean; M50B50: two rows of common bean between two rows of maize; M75B25: one row of common bean between three rows of maize; M100: sole maize.



Universidad del Zulia /Venezuela/Revista de facultad de agronomía/ revagronomia@gmail.com /ISSN: 0378-7818

 

Licencia de Creative Commons
Este obra está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-CompartirIgual 3.0 Unported.